Home

Sermons & Bible Studies

Abide in Christ

Christ in Old Testament

Personal Growth

Daily Devotions

SELAH PAUSE THINKclear.gif (43 bytes)

    
      SEARCH ME!
 
  Find:    

SELAH!   Pause - reflect - just think of that!

Reflections for the thinking person

-----------


SELAH INDEX

ABIDE IN CHRIST MENU

TELL A FRIEND ABOUT SELAH

Bible Study Series

Philippians

Epistle of James

People in the Life of Christ

The Beatitudes of Jesus

1 & 2 Thessalonians

Our Vital Union in Christ

Christ in the Psalms

7 Last Sayings of Jesus

Miracles at Calvary

Isaiah

Letter to Romans

Life of Elijah

Family Foundations

Christian Stewardship

 



 
 

From Despair to Hope

It is almost uncanny how the poet describes the abandonment of the sufferer by God to the scorn of evil people who mocked Him. The Hebrew poet-king wrote,

But I am a worm and not a man,
A reproach of men and despised by the people.
 All who see me sneer at me;
They separate with the lip, they wag the head,   saying,
 “Commit yourself to the Lord; let Him deliver him;
Let Him rescue him, because He delights in him” (Psalm 22:6-8).

King David writes using gestures of helplessness, frailty, and hopelessness in these verses. It is another vivid picture of the events at Calvary put in writing a thousand years before they actually took place in history (Matt. 27:39-43).

“They open wide their mouth at me, as a ravening and a roaring loin” (v. 13). The crowd at the crucifixion of Jesus did just that in graphic detail. His bones were pulled out of joint at the hands, arms, shoulders and pelvis (v. 14). “I am poured out like water, and all my bones are out of joint, my heart is like wax; it is melted within me” (v.14). Perspiration pours profusely from the intense suffering, and the exhaustion and strain affects the functioning of His heart. With His strength exhausted, and dehydration, His tongue clings to His mouth from extreme thirst (v. 15). “My strength is dried up like potsherd, and my tongue cleaves to my jaws” (v. 15).

We draw up near the cross in verse sixteen and hear him say, “For dogs [Jewish term for derision for Gentiles] have surrounded me; a band of evildoers has encompassed me; they pierced my hands and my feet” (cf. Matt. 27:35; Jn. 20:20, 25).

They stare at Him on the cross. He is so frail from suffering they can count His bones on His naked body. Even the casting of lots for His clothing is literally fulfilled (v. 18; cf. Matt. 27:35; Lk. 23:34; Jn. 19:24; 19:23; Mk. 15:24).

Any unbiased reader of this messianic poem must come to the inescapable conclusion that it finds its historical fulfillment in the crucifixion of Christ.

The death of Jesus Christ made perfect atonement for our sins. He was forsaken of God so we could be forgiven.

This matchless messianic poem also declares that the suffering servant of God died in triumph knowing that His suffering produced perfect atonement for the sinner. He tells how His prayer was heard and affirms that He will praise God before the brethren in the great assembly.

There is an abrupt change in the steady progress of the poem from the despair in suffering to one of renewed trust in God. Verses 22-31 conclude with the results that spring from the resurrection. It closes with a message of thanksgiving and hope in the anticipation of the proclamation of the good news.

“I will tell of Thy name to my brethren; in the midst of the assembly I will praise thee” (v. 22). He admonishes others, “You who fear the LORD, praise Him” (v. 23a).

Moreover, the message is not just for the Jewish brethren (vv. 22-24), but also “All the ends of the earth will remember and turn to the LORD, and all the families of the nations will worship before Thee” (v. 27). Is this not the great missionary message preached after the resurrection of Christ? (cf. Matt. 28:18-20; Acts 1:8; Rom. 1:16; Phil. 2:8-11; Rev. 4-5).

The psalmist gives a great invitation for all to humble themselves and trust in the Savior. Salvation is for those who “fear the LORD” (vv. 23, 25), “seek the LORD” (v. 26), “remember and turn to the LORD” (v. 27), and “bow down before Him” (vv. 27, 29). It is for all who will call upon His name and be saved. 

People yet to be born in future generations will serve Him (v. 30-31). “It will be told of the Lord to the coming generation. They will come and will declare His righteousness to a people who will be born, that He has performed it.”

You and I are included in this great multitude (Jn. 17:20). The Savior had you and me on His mind while He hung on the tree. Have you responded to Him in faith?

Selah!

Message by Wil Pounds (c) 2006

Click for printer friendly page

SELAH INDEX

CLICK to E-mail SELAH! to a friend.

 

 

LINKS  XML  
What are RSS Feeds?
Java code for FREE RSS Daily Devotional feeds for Webmasters
Google RSS Reader 
 Add to My Yahoo! 

 CLICK ON ME TO GO TO SELAH! ESPANOL En Espanol
Una pagina con reflexiones de la Palabra de Dios para hoy.


Luis Palau
Syndicated
Article

 

Daily
Devotionals

Daily Devotions

Walking with the Giants

SERMONS BIBLE STUDIES

Full length Bible Studies & Expository Sermons

 

CHRIST IN THE OLD TESTAMENT

Christ in the Old Testament


 

SEARCH ME!  Abide in Christ Website   Includes all pages on our servers.

ABIDE IN CHRIST SELAH

Home

Sermons & Bible Studies

Abide in Christ

Christ in Old Testament

Personal Growth

Daily Devotions

(c) 2006  Message by Wil Pounds. Anyone is free to use this material and distribute it, but it may not be sold under any circumstances whatsoever without the author's written consent.

www.AbideInChrist.com        www.AbideInChrist.org    

       [Valid RSS]